Film Review

Keys of life

Jimi Hendrix and Nick Cave feature in two very different movies

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cheryl@sfbg.com

FILM The music biopic is a tricky beast. Very few directors are able to compellingly compress true-life tales into films that actually have some interest beyond "Hey, that famous/infamous thing you already knew about happened like this!" — though superior performances (recent Oscar-winning examples: 2004's Ray, 2005's Walk the Line) can help buoy the results. Far rarer are more artistically daring films that unfold more like docu-dramas than glossovers, like Control (2007) and Sid and Nancy (1986).Read more »

Waltz work

Tarantino's muse can't save Terry Gilliam's 'The Zero Theorem'

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Joyous blues

New doc spotlights the musical wanderings of Arhoolie Records founder Chris Strachwitz

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By Nicole Gluckstern

arts@sfbg.com

FILM In an early scene from Maureen Gosling and Chris Simon's documentary on the life and musical obsessions of their mutual friend Chris Strachwitz of Arhoolie Records, we see Strachwitz behind the wheel of his car, struggling to explain the common thread that joins his wide-ranging musical tastes, from country blues to Cajun Zydeco to bordertown conjunto.Read more »

Falling apart together

Siblings mend their broken relationship — if not their broken lives — in dramedy 'The Skeleton Twins'

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Urban decay

A family struggles to survive in crime drama 'Metro Manila'

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Flynn and out

Hollywood-scandal tale 'The Last of Robin Hood' comes up short

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High fly

A baseball legend comes to life in 'No No: A Dockumentary'

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Cruel stories of youth

'Rich Hill' and 'Me and You' offer very different (but equally compelling) coming-of-age tales

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arts@sfbg.com

FILM Richard Linklater's Boyhood is so popular that by now it's acquired the seemingly inevitable backlash against such overwhelming critical support — god forbid "the critics," that mysterious, possibly secret-handshaking Masonic elite, should tell anyone what to think. It's a lucky movie that invites hostility by being so widely (and, admittedly, a bit hyperbolically) considered a masterpiece. Whatever your parade, someone will always be dying to rain on it.Read more »

Cubicle cult

Stephen Root on staplers and the enduring appeal of 'Office Space'

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arts@sfbg.com

FILM For anybody who has ever had to put up with a creepy boss, annoying co-workers, or a soul-sucking work environment — and that is most likely all of us, at some point in our lives — Mike Judge's 1999 comedy Office Space has become a supremely entertaining and highly relatable touchstone for its razor-sharp take on office politics and corporate culture.Read more »